Author: Nada El-Hammoud, Middle East Monitor

  • Refugees twice over, Palestinians from Syria feel ‘unwelcome’ in Lebanon

    Ten kilometres north of Israel lies Rashidieh, the largest Palestinian refugee camp in Tyre, Lebanon. Originally built by the French in 1936 for Armenian refugees, the “new” Rashidieh was built in 1963 by UNRWA to accommodate Palestinian refugees who were evacuated from Baalbek. And now, Rashidieh has become home to a new group of refugees – Palestinians who used to live in Syria. Arriving at the camp, the refugees have escaped the violence in Syria, but their lives are far from serene. “Palestinians in Syria lived in excellent conditions, there was no differentiation between the Palestinians and the ethnic Syrians… a Palestinian in Syria is able to work in the same professions as a Syrian, one can have his own […]

  • Refugees twice over, Palestinians from Syria feel ‘unwelcome’ in Lebanon

    Ten kilometres north of Israel lies Rashidieh, the largest Palestinian refugee camp in Tyre, Lebanon. Originally built by the French in 1936 for Armenian refugees, the “new” Rashidieh was built in 1963 by UNRWA to accommodate Palestinian refugees who were evacuated from Baalbek. And now, Rashidieh has become home to a new group of refugees – Palestinians who used to live in Syria. Arriving at the camp, the refugees have escaped the violence in Syria, but their lives are far from serene. “Palestinians in Syria lived in excellent conditions, there was no differentiation between the Palestinians and the ethnic Syrians… a Palestinian in Syria is able to work in the same professions as a Syrian, one can have his own […]

  • Syrian refugee: ‘Europeans are using our name to make money’

    Fatima’s husband and two of her brothers were killed by fighters in Syria. Fearing for her children’s lives, she escaped her homeland and embarked on an arduous journey to Morocco where the family posed as Moroccans and were able to cross into Europe. “Arriving in France was like the end of a bad dream, it was a new start for us.” Less than six months later, Fatima and her children are now begging on the streets. I first met Fatima (not her real name) at a slip road in the Saint-Denis suburb of Paris, home to the famous Stade de France. She was approaching cars stuck at the traffic light, two small children in tow, and clutching a cardboard sign that read “Famille Syrie”, Syrian […]

  • This is Palestine

    Two years ago, Mohamed’s home was raided in the middle of the night. At around 2am Israeli soldiers kicked down the down the door and entered the house, throwing shot grenades and brandishing machine guns. The incident had a profound effect on Mohamed’s 12-year-old son, who completely lost the power of speech and has not spoken a word since. Sadly, occurrences like this are far from unique; every day, Palestinian children are subject to horrifying ordeals under the occupation, and many will never recover from the psychological trauma. The plight of the Palestinian people is an ongoing struggle for a better life, a life free from checkpoints and machine guns and the terrors of living under Israeli rule. John McColgan, […]

  • 100 Balfour Road

    The 2 November this year marks the centenary of the Balfour Declaration – 100 years since Britain signed over a country that it did not own, displacing nearly a million people at the time. It’s one of the most crucial points in modern British history, yet any mention of the word “Balfour” is met with vacant stares and awkward coughs. Nobody seems to have heard of this mysterious Balfour (“Wasn’t he a Victorian poet?”) and his declaration (“Wasn’t that in Harry Potter?”)- do you know what the Balfour declaration was? Do you know anything about Balfour himself? 100 Balfour Road, an 11 minute short-film, seeks to educate the population on the Balfour declaration and what it meant for the Palestinian people in simple, close-to-home […]